Walk, Hike, Saunter: Seasoned Women Share Tales and Trails

Fields of lupine

My new book, “Walk, Hike, Saunter: Seasoned Women Share Tales and Trails” will be published this fall.

For years, I have thought about writing a new book about women hikers; Covid 19 and its restrictions has helped it come to pass. It’s not that I wanted to be told to shelter-in-place, or to have to cancel exciting travel plans, but at least this time has provided an opportunity to do something creative at home. 

Walk, Hike, Saunter…
is for hikers, especially women, who are looking for motivation, encouragement, information, and inspiration to put on their trail shoes and get on hiking trails here and abroad. It features the contributions of thirty-two wise women, all 45 years of age or greater, who share their sometimes humorous, occasionally frightening, always open stories of the joy walking brings to their lives.

How and where—the sharing begins
They tell where they hike, and how they keep going when things get tough. The stories they tell are the ones they would share at hiker gatherings and around a campfire (if time and circumstances allow).

There’s more to come!
We’ll soon be posting more details about the book here—in particular the names of some of the women who are included. If you are active in the long-distance hiking community, you’ll recognize several because of their extraordinary feats—such as earning the Triple Crown Award for completing the Appalachian, Continental Divide, and Pacific Crest Trails.

However, there’s something for all hikers
Walk, Hike, Saunter is for anyone who hikes—whether in their neighborhood, on the paths in their local parks, or along long-distance trails in the U.S. or abroad.

This has been a wonderful project for me because of all the generous and accomplished women I have been able to work with—hearing their stories has been inspiring—and helped me stay (somewhat) sane during these trying times.

I am very excited that we at Shepherd Canyon Books will soon be able to share Walk, Hike, Saunter with readers.

Cheers, 
Susan Alcorn

 

Gratitude for our trails

Thanksgiving and Gratitude

Sunol Regional Park, Alameda County, CA

Here in the S.F. Bay Area, the days have been so mild with daytime temperatures in the 60s and 70s, it’s hard to believe that it’s almost Thanksgiving. However, when it starts getting dark at 5 PM, and colder, we realize we have to work a bit harder to fit hikes into our shorter daytime hours.

This reminds me that I have much to appreciate about where I live, why I try to support environmental causes, and how grateful I am for the thousands of people here who work to protect our environment.

Sunol Regional Park, Alameda County, CA

In particular, I am reminded of the importance of the regional parklands around me, which…

  • provide hundreds of miles of trails that I can hike. 
  • bring ever-changing displays of flowers, trees, and other plants. 
  • have quiet places to clear my head and exercise my body.
  • inspire my writing and photography with its scenic beauty.
  • support wildlife—from ladybugs covering entire branches; herons stalking their prey; hawks soaring overhead; flickers hammering cavities in tree branches to build their nests.  
  • offer the opportunity to gain perspective on our place on this earth.
  • allow free, or inexpensive, visits to all who want to come. 

And, people are instrumental in what happens…

  • by envisioning the setting aside of parcels of land to create parklands.
  • when they work to acquire properties that would otherwise turn into developments.
  • by volunteering to help with fund-raising, to interface with the public at the kiosks and gift shops, and by organizing work parties for weed control.
  • when they become park employees that build fences and picnic tables, clear out invasive plants, repair storm damaged trails and roadways, and educate park visitors. 
  • by voting in tax measures to support and improve our parks

Galen Rowell, photographer, climber, author (1940-2002) in  Bay Area Wild: A Celebration of the Natural Heritage of the San Francisco Bay Area wrote,  “The San Francisco Bay Area holds the most extensive system of wild greenbelts in the nation, with more than 200 parks and other protected areas lying within forty miles of the city.”

We are truly blessed to live here. 

Minimizing your impact on the trail

 

Trail and Camp Ethics

Don’t build illegal campfire rings!

Anytime we hike or camp, we have an effect on our environment. The goal is to minimize negative impacts. If we damage the trail, we might  affect the next person’s trip or destroy the homes of wild animals. Some actions that may seem benign to us at the time may be quite disastrouspolluting the drinking water of a community, causing flooding by erosion, or destroying homes and forest by fire. 

To start… 

1.Concentrate use on existing trails and campsites [ed.: don’t cause erosion by taking shortcuts!]. Those shortcuts that create new trails through the dirt will become channels for water during the winter. 
2.Pack it in, pack it out. After use, inspect your campsite and rest areas for trash or spilled foods. Pack out all trash, leftover food and litter. [ed.: Orange peels can last 6 months, bananas 12 months.] 
 
3.Pack out toilet paper and hygiene products. There is little to no chance that these items will decompose before they are discovered by animals or other humans. There are far too many people on our trails and in our wildlands for these products to remain undisturbed and unnoticed. 
 
4.Deposit solid human waste* in catholes dug 6 to 8 inches deep, at least 200 feet (about 70 human paces) from water, camp and trails. Cover and disguise the cathole when finished. Note: leaving your poop under a rock near your campsite is not ok! Not only may it be a health hazard, but the next person to move the rockto build a campfire pit, for repairing a trailwill not appreciate the mound of feces that you left behind. Bury it!
 
*In some areas, there may be regulations required that human waste be carried out—for example, on Mt. Whitney or Denali, or in various river rafting areas.

Leave No Trace…

The Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics’ website tells us that the principals they give are modified or revisited from time to time as researchers gain new insights into protecting our outdoors. The current seven LNT Principles are: Plan and Prepare; Travel & Camp on Durable Surfaces; Dispose of Waste Properly; Leave What You Find; Minimize Campfire Impacts; Respect Wildlife, Be Considerate of Other Visitors.  Click here for more info. 

Planning for Berryessa Peak

Summer hills on Berryessa Peak Trail

Ok, perhaps tackling Berryessa isn’t exactly a major expedition, but for us it requires some extra planning. The peak, at 3,057 feet, isn’t the highest of the  ‘Nifty Ninety’ Peaks, but the elevation gain is given as 3,500-feet. That, with its distance out and back of 14.5 miles, is a bit too much for a day hike for us. On top of that, our driving time from home is two hours each way. What to do?  

Lake Berryessa and vicinity

Ralph, probably because he is raring to do this peak, drove up to the Wine Country to get a lay of the land in early August. Summers in the area can be hot–they regularly hit the 90s and 100s. Nevertheless, he set out–very early and with adequate water–that fine day.

Oak trees give some shade

He didn’t plan to do the entire hike; he wanted to figure out where we could camp partway along. When he came home, he reported that he had found a place where we could camp. It was up a draw to a flat area about four miles along.

After hiking a quarter-mile in from the highway, camping within the Knoxville Wildlife Area or the BLM lands is legal. But further along, hikers have to stay within an easement area for a short distance as the trail goes through private property.

Ralph’s main concern remains the lack of water. If we camp, we will either need to carry all we need or cache some ahead of time because there is none in the area when the creeks are dry. 

Exploring Berryessa Peak Trail again

In early September, we decided to go up again. I had never been to Lake Berryessa and looked forward to seeing both the lake and the first part of the trail. The trailhead, which starts in the Knoxville State Wildlife Area, is next to a pullout alongside the Knoxville Road and is marked Berryessa Peak Trail. Because it was forecast to be hot again, we planned only to get in our 10,000 steps while enjoying the hike.

Star Thistle can be wicked!

The first 1.6 miles of the trail was easy. And the recent, short-duration hunting season (check the website for future dates!) probably improved the conditions, because the awful Star Thistle had been somewhat flattened by the increased foot traffic along the route.

As we followed the dirt track of the old ranch road, we tried to avoid bumping into the Star Thistle. We had worn long pants to protect our legs from the sharp spines. I had even dug out my Dirty Girl Gaiters for added protection

We passed the occasional oak tree, which provided welcome shade, and watched butterflies flitting toward stone-filled creek beds that must have supplied the water they needed, but wouldn’t have sustained our lives. 

We reached an intersection marked with a 4×4 lettered “BPT” (Berryessa Peak Trail). While the ranch road continued ahead, we turned right (south) to start some climbing into the hills. We continued another mile or so, then found a good place to sit under an oak tree and have our lunch.

View of Lake Berryessa from the peak trail

We’ll return when it’s cooler

It was time for us to turn back so we would miss the worst of any commute traffic. We noted that it was 97 degrees–and as we had read, “THIS IS NOT A SUMMER HIKE.”

We both felt that we had been prepared for the high temperature, but we would have needed much more water than the two liters we were carrying to safely go much further. Besides, we want to do this peak, and camp out, with our hiking buddies Tom and Patricia under more favorable hiking conditions!

Meanwhile, if you decide to go for it, click here for details, maps, and more. 

Is 10,000 a magic number?

What about 10,000 steps?

Along the Vezelay, FR., Camino route.

For many years, 10,000 has been given as the magic number of steps to take daily to improve our fitness level and boost our longevity. More recently, however, we’ve read that 10,000 is really an arbitrary number. In one study of women (average age 72), click here, it was found that 4,000 steps per day was beneficial. Additionally, the study said that anything over 7,500 steps brought no additional benefit.

That is not to say that counting steps isn’t a helpful tool; it can be. It is an fairly effective method of keeping track of your steps and mileage. Just as writing in a food diary is a more accurate way of seeing what your caloric intake is than relying on a running total in your head, a step counter will probably keep you more honest. And, as the study stated, for most people, any increase in steps is helpful. 

For us as hikers, another takeaway is that counting steps is not a well-rounded way to become trail-ready, particularly if your aim is longer hikes and multi-day backpack trips. Nevertheless, I find aiming for 10,000 motivating, and I am relieved to learn that I am not harming myself when I don’t reach that number. 

In my article, Training for Walking, Hiking, and Backpacking, you’ll find plenty of advice to achieve greater hiking stamina and strength that goes beyond counting steps.