Susan Alcorn’s Backpacking & Hiking Tales and Tips, July 2021

Susan Alcorn’s Backpacking & Hiking Tales and Tips, #265 July 2021

 

Wishing you a happy and safe 4th of July!!!

Contents:
#1. Yosemite’s new climbing exhibits — read more
#2. “Hiking the Appalachian Trail: A Beginner’s Guide” by Karen Berger
#3. Amanda Schaffer, the Pilgrim Pouch, and Susan Alcorn’s interview
#4. Six Moon’s description of trail on Mt. St. Helens
#5. We are changing newsletter hosts
#6. Lightning risk ratings
#7. Pilgrim Gathering — reminder
#8. John Ladd presents
#9. The ALDHA-West Gathering to be Virtual in 2021

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Mount Sizer makes it 88 peaks on the Nifty Ninety

Mount Sizer, Henry Coe SP

There are several reasons why we waited until near the end of the list of 90 peaks on the Ninety Nifty Peak challenge to do Sizer. The first was that we figured we’d need to backpack in instead of doing the peak as a day hike. Second, everyone says it is hard — no matter their age. Third, we wanted to be stronger than when we started this whole  challenge (to work our way up). I wasn’t confident I could do it. 

Upper Camp

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Guest Post: Amy Racina

Water Sports
Amy Racina, contributor

Amy Racina

It was a lovely evening at Wailaki Campground on the fringes of California’s Lost Coast. I set up my tent, barbequed some zucchini and the slab of bison I had picked up along the way, and staked down my tent on a nice flat spot. Though showers were expected, I wasn’t worried. I had a good reliable tent.

I snuggled in to read a good book and enjoy some restful dreams. Warm and dry in my tent, I dreamt that I was floating peacefully down a river on a raft.

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Minimizing your impact on the trail

 

Trail and Camp Ethics

Don’t build illegal campfire rings!

Anytime we hike or camp, we have an effect on our environment. The goal is to minimize negative impacts. If we damage the trail, we might  affect the next person’s trip or destroy the homes of wild animals. Some actions that may seem benign to us at the time may be quite disastrouspolluting the drinking water of a community, causing flooding by erosion, or destroying homes and forest by fire. 

To start… 

1.Concentrate use on existing trails and campsites [ed.: don’t cause erosion by taking shortcuts!]. Those shortcuts that create new trails through the dirt will become channels for water during the winter. 
2.Pack it in, pack it out. After use, inspect your campsite and rest areas for trash or spilled foods. Pack out all trash, leftover food and litter. [ed.: Orange peels can last 6 months, bananas 12 months.] 
 
3.Pack out toilet paper and hygiene products. There is little to no chance that these items will decompose before they are discovered by animals or other humans. There are far too many people on our trails and in our wildlands for these products to remain undisturbed and unnoticed. 
 
4.Deposit solid human waste* in catholes dug 6 to 8 inches deep, at least 200 feet (about 70 human paces) from water, camp and trails. Cover and disguise the cathole when finished. Note: leaving your poop under a rock near your campsite is not ok! Not only may it be a health hazard, but the next person to move the rockto build a campfire pit, for repairing a trailwill not appreciate the mound of feces that you left behind. Bury it!
 
*In some areas, there may be regulations required that human waste be carried out—for example, on Mt. Whitney or Denali, or in various river rafting areas.

Leave No Trace…

The Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics’ website tells us that the principals they give are modified or revisited from time to time as researchers gain new insights into protecting our outdoors. The current seven LNT Principles are: Plan and Prepare; Travel & Camp on Durable Surfaces; Dispose of Waste Properly; Leave What You Find; Minimize Campfire Impacts; Respect Wildlife, Be Considerate of Other Visitors.  Click here for more info. 

Nifty Ninety Peaks — off to Big Basin, Part 2

Mount McAbee in Big Basin Redwoods State Park

After our overnight in Blooms Creek campground, we packed up (checkout time from the campsite was noon) and drove the short distance to the park’s headquarters. We were headed for Mount McAbee, which according to the Sierra Club’s #NiftyNinety Peaks list, was at 1,730 feet in elevation. It would be peak #60 for us.

Interestingly it was labeled as ‘McAbee Lookout’ on the park’s map. When we reached the prescribed 1,730 foot elevation, we found a bench — we were at the McAbee Lookout. Only days later, did research show that the peak itself, as reported by David Sanger, is at 1,840 feet and would have involved a 10+-minute bushwhack uphill.

Nevertheless, because we reached the elevation given for the challenge, we consider we were successful. Maybe next time I’ll scramble through the thick vegetation to the peak.The hike

The hike, about six miles round trip, was moderate — and fun. We started out from the parking area by the visitors’ center, passed the amphitheater, and found the Skyline to the Sea Trail. We took that to an intersection and proceeded on the  Howard King Trail (instead of Berry Creek Falls). The Howard King took us on a mostly uphill route all the way to McAbee Overlook. Since the trail had been in a forest of Redwood, Madrone, Bay, Fir (and more) most of the way, it was a treat to reach the overlook and look out to see the Pacific Ocean and Waddell Beach just a few miles away as the crow flies. 

We were happy to be there on a reasonably clear day because we knew that we could have found ourselves with views blocked by fog. We snagged the log bench at the overlook. Moments later other hikers came along who would have also have enjoyed a restful place for lunch — some were going to continue on down the mountain Berry Creek Falls.  

We ate our snacks, took a few photos and then returned to our car following the gently descending Hihn Hammond fire road and then went back onto the Howard King and Skyline trails the rest of the way.   


To celebrate, we dropped into Boulder Creek Pizza and Pub for lunch. I enjoyed the ‘Light & Loaded’ pizza; the personal size was only six inches in diameter, but it was piled high with chicken, artichokes, mushrooms and more. A great weekend for sure!  
Trail hiked: Sep. 29, 2018