Susan Alcorn’s Backpacking & Hiking Tales and Tips, January 2022

Susan Alcorn’s Backpacking & Hiking Tales and Tips, #270, January 2022

Hi everyone, Happy New Year!

Tule elk at Pierce Point, Point Reyes Ntl. Seashore, Marin, CA

#1. Pilgrim guidebook author Beebe Bahrami and her wolf encounter
#2. Snowshoeing and backpacking adventures with Yosemite Conservancy
#3. Are Monarch Butterflies Recovering?
#4. SYMG (Southern Yosemite Mountain Guides)
#5. 600-mile trail underway in the Sierra
#6. 2022 Pilgrim gathering and Hospitalero training coming up
#7. ALDHA-West info
#8. S.F. Bay Area Regional hikes: DIY in Point Reyes to see  Snowy Plover? Tule Elk? Coho Salmon?

Articles:
#1. Beebe Bahrami shares her wolf encounter story.
Beebe is known and beloved by many for her Camino guidebooks including The Spiritual Traveler Spain—A Guide to Sacred Sites and Pilgrim Routes (Paulist Press), Historic Walking Guides: Madrid(DestinWorld Publishing), and her newest— Moon Camino de Santiago (Avalon Travel/Hachette Book Group). She was one of the chapters (what the women of the book are calling themselves!) in my Walk, Hike, Saunter where she enticed to learn more of the story about her encounter with a wolf while hiking on a narrow path near Luarca on the Camino del Norte.

How lucky we are that her story has now been published with Perceptive Travel and I appreciate that she is sharing it with us here. “Time evaporated and space dissolved, as did the wolf’s agitation and mine. I felt the air molecules and the earth between us lose all barriers and meld and weave a profound interconnectedness, what I can only call communion.” Read on…  https://www.perceptivetravel.com/issues/0122/asturias.html.

#2. Snowshoeing and Backpacking Adventures with Yosemite Conservancy: “Experience the quiet beauty of winter in the park during a day of hiking or snowshoeing at Badger Pass, Dewey Point, Yosemite Valley, or the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias.” I can attest to what beautiful scenery you will have whether it’s on an evening full moon hike or a daytime forest ramble. Yosemite Conservancy has a partnership with the park and they offer excursions for those of all levels of expertise—beginner to advanced. Learn more and register here. https://yosemite.org/experience/outdoor-adventures/

#3. Seemingly Headed for Extinction in 2020, Western Monarchs Boom Back in 2021. Daniel Roman in Bay Nature (December 8, 2021) writes, “Since 1997, volunteers organized by the conservation group Xerces Society have counted western monarchs over Thanksgiving at the butterflies’ overwintering sites around coastal California, as part of the Western Monarch Thanksgiving Count.’

They collect data from more than 200 monitoring sites. In 2020, the count hit an all-time low — less than 2,000 monarchs — a number Bay Nature reported last year, that “represents an astonishing continuation of the near-total collapse of the western migratory population of the species over the last few decades.”

But this season’s numbers are encouraging and the changes significant. In 2020, three important overwintering sites in  along the California coast—Pacific Grove, Pismo Beach, and Big Sur— had fewer than 300 butterflies total. This season (2021—2022) more than 10,000 monarchs were counted.

Why this rebound is unknown, but there are a couple of theories. One hypothesis is that this year’s boom is due to an influx of monarchs from the eastern migratory population — which typically migrates between Mexico and the United States and Canada east of the Rocky Mountains — joining western monarchs, thereby adding to the population.

What seems more likely, however, is good luck — a chance happening of good weather at the right time and other factors. The Xerces Society researchers wrote that, like other insects, “’monarchs [numbers] fluctuate from year to year in response to the temperature, rainfall, the availability of food, and other factors.’”

“A single adult female can lay 300 eggs, which multiplies with each of the monarchs’ typically four of five breeding generations in a year. So, if it’s a good year, with good weather, monarchs can produce a lot of offspring.”

In conclusion, it’s very good news, but there’s no guarantee that the monarch population has recovered. We have far to go to again see the numbers we had in the 1980’s — when millions of monarchs overwintered in California.  

You can subscribe to Bay Nature at https://baynature.org/ Meanwhile, people can help by continuing to create and improve butterfly habitat— planting native milkweed and flowers that provide nectar, and reducing pesticide use.

#4. Southern Yosemite Mountain Guides has been in business for 30 years and this year’s trips look as exciting as ever! SYMG sends season’s greetings! Their trips, often using pack animals to reduce what you have to carry, take you to what they describe as “arguably one of the most beautiful places on earth, Yosemite National Park and the High Sierra!”

Here’s a sampling:
“JMT: Rae Lakes Loop: Backpacking: Explore a famous section of the John Muir Trail. We’ll navigate the Rae Lakes Loop through the wilderness of King’s Canyon National Park. Along the way we’ll tackle Glen Pass and camp in the Rae Lakes…”

“Mt Whitney w/ Horsepack Support. Pack Supported Trekking. Climb Mt Whitney and the remote backcountry wilderness of Sequoia National Park! Pack stock will ease our burden as we travel between camps along scenic high-country sections of the famous John Muir Trail and Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail…” Website is https://www.symg.com/

#5. Lost Sierra Route: Wow! Guy Joaquin, co-coordinator of the Northern California Pilgrim group, shared this exciting news for hikers. The facebook link is here.  “Just heard of this amazing project underway: a 600-mile, multi-use trail connecting 15 Northern California and Nevada mountain towns from Truckee and Reno to Susanville.

“After reading this article, I watched a few videos online from the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship who are leading the charge. Their plans include routing the trails though the towns, instead of away, to connect users with the local communities and businesses so there will be accommodations and other support services. In other words, it could be very Camino-like. There is even a passport and stamp program in the works! Definitely something to keep an eye on and even maybe support.” Link to the trail project here. https://sierratrails.org/connected-communities/

#6. Camino Gathering and Hospitalero Training. “Get Prepared for the 2022 Gathering!” Dave Donselar, Chair of the 2022 Gathering, shares the details. The 2022 Annual Gathering of Pilgrims is will be held in Alexandria, VA. “This will be American Pilgrims on the Camino’s 25th year of gathering pilgrims together and we look forward to seeing you at the YMCA Blue Ridge Assembly in Black Mountain, NC (near Asheville) from March 31 to April 3, 2022.

“Registration will open in early January. Members will be notified when registration opens. Visit the American Pilgrims’ website americanpilgrims.org for additional details on the program including the most recent draft of the program, the cost, accommodations options, and the most up-to-date health precautions as we complete our preparations. Also be sure to check for email updates from American Pilgrims . . . we’ll be sending out updates before the event!

“Hospitalero Corner: Training. Hospitalero Trainings are starting again in 2022. The first one will be March 29-31 immediately preceding the 2022 Annual Gathering in Black Mountain, NC. Watch our website for updated information. Registration will open in early January”

#7. Info about the Triple Crown of Hiking: You hear about it—an award for hiking the of the Pacific Crest, Continental Divide, and Appalachian trails. ALDHA-West, the organization that presents the award, gives some specifics for how you can tackle the challenge. “Happy New Year! As we enter into 2022, we will continue to dedicate our Tuesday posts for the next several weeks to address FAQs about the Triple Crown. Q: “Does it matter how I hiked the trail? Section hikes over multiple years, thru-hike, etc.?

A: “Nope. As long as you have hiked each trail in its entirety, section, thru, or flip-flop doesn’t matter.” Follow them on Facebook to read further information as it appears. 

#8. Great time to visit Marin County. Perhaps you are looking for a great hike that is short and sweet? Look no farther than one of these:
Abbotts Lagoon in Pt. Reyes National Park. This is an easy hike out to the ocean, which can be extended either north or south depending on whether you want or continue on flat or hill terrain. Trailhead is along the Pierce Point Road. The lagoon draws many kinds of birds—this time of year, Snowy Plover are reportedly nesting in the sand. https://www.pointreyesnature.com/blog/2020/9/19/western-snowy-plover

Pierce Point in Pt. Reyes. This is a moderate hike, out and back, on a dirt trail along the northernmost point of the Pt. Reyes peninsula. As you hike out to see the resident Tule Elk, you’ll be walking with the Pacific Ocean on the west side and Tomales Bay on the east. To the endpoint, Tomales Point, is about 10 miles round trip, but you’ll see the elk long before that. Google maps here.  

Lagunitas Creek/Samuel P. Taylor State Park. Easy. This is the location of the last notable wild Coho Salmon population in the Bay Area. The salmon this year were able to migrate from nearby Tomales Bay.

The females are in the process of building their nests (redd), which they do by swimming on their sides, arching their backs, and using their tails to smooth out the underwater gravel. When the female is content with her redd, she releases pheromones, which is a signal  indicating she is ready to lay her eggs. It’s also a signal to the males to approach to fertilize them — which they need to do quickly as the eggs are only viable for a few seconds.

To see them, you can go on your own; it’s best to go when  it’s less crowded on weekdays. Look for the salmon in the vicinity of the Leo T. Cronin Fish Viewing Area. Better yet, to get a better idea of where to look, and what the behaviors mean, sign up for a guided tour with the Salmon Protection and Watershed Network (SPAWN) part of the Turtle Island Restoration Network in Lagunitas. Tours are available on weekends Jan 9 to 30—and they will fill quickly. (Eventbrite/click here.) 
~~~~~~~~~
Thank you everyone. Stay well, keep hiking when prudent. I encourage you to send in items of interest to the hiking community to me at backpack45 “at sign” yahoo.com

Susan ‘backpack45’ Alcorn
Shepherd Canyon Books, Oakland, CA
https://www.susandalcorn.com
https://www.backpack45.com

Author of Walk, Hike, Saunter: Seasoned Women Share Tales and Trails; Healing Miles: Gifts from the Caminos Norte and Primitivo, Patagonia Chronicle: On Foot in Torres del Paine; We’re in the Mountains Not over the Hill: Tales and Tips from Seasoned Women Backpackers; and Camino Chronicle: Walking to Santiago.

Please note: Hiking and backpacking can be risky endeavors. Always be prepared for emergencies and carry food, water, shelter (warm clothing, etc.), flashlight/headlamp, matches, first aid supplies, and maps. Cell phones don’t always work. Leave word where you are traveling and when you are due back.

  

Susan Alcorn’s Backpacking & Hiking Tales and Tips, August 2021

Susan Alcorn’s Backpacking & Hiking Tales and Tips, #266 August 2021

 Hope you are enjoying your summer!

Contents:
#1. Hikers’ Rash/Golfers’ vasculitis
#2. American Pilgrims on the Camino gathering 2022.
#3. Plans for a new long distance trail in France 2500 km, 6 stages https://en.hexatrek.com/

#4. PCT Summer Festival
#5. ALDHA-WEST info
#6. New FKT (Fastest Known Time) on the Pacific Crest Trail
#7. Marcyn Clements, author of Shinrin-Yoku
#8. Bears — Fears and Facts
#9. Hipcamp and REI
#10. S.F. Bay Regional: Berkeley Path Wanderers’ many hikes

Articles:
#1. Hikers’ Rash/Golfers’ vasculitis. After recently having a new episode of hikers’ rash, I was very interested to read Diane Spicer’s extensive information of what is it, what causes it, what to do about it, and how to avoid it in her Hiking for Her article.  This will be a brief summary, with my comments interspersed, but the link here will give much more detail. https://www.hiking-for-her.com/hikers-rash.html  

“Hikers rash (also spelled as hiker’s rash) pops up mysteriously on one or both legs, and makes you wonder what’s going on with your skin.” “The rash occurs on ankles and calves, sometimes even up to the thighs.” “It’s usually on areas NOT covered by socks or clothing. Above the sock line, in other words.”

It is “exercise induced vasculitis (EIV). Any ” -itis” means inflammation, and “vasc” tells you what’s inflamed: blood vessels.”

Susan: This describes what happens to me to a T. It’s only above my socks. Mine does not hurt of itch, and goes away on its own in a few days.

I definitely agree with Diane’s note: “This article is not medical advice. Always consult a medical care professional with your health concerns.”

I learned a few things I hadn’t known previously—that it is sometimes called the “Disney rash.” Which when you stop scratching your head will make sense—hikers/backpackers,   golfers, and visitors to Disneyland have SOME things in common—they walk a lot, often for hours at a time, in the summer—these things put pressure on their lower legs, which can cause the blood vessels to expand.

Prevention could include keeping your legs covered with lightweight UPF fabric or wearing compression socks; staying hydrated, applying a wet compress (bandana, etc.), elevating your feet during breaks, and conditioning ahead of time. I guess I would say yikes at this point because Diane reports that “Dr. [Oliver] Espitia estimates about 77% of those who have already experienced hiker’s rash, have an elevated risk of a repeat occurrence.” For further information: https://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/what-is-disney-rash and https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27591889/.

#2. American Pilgrims on the Camino gathering 2022. “Announced in La Concha, the pilgrim magazine. “…know that we’re already working on our return to the YMCA Blue Ridge Assembly in Black Mountain, NC (near Asheville) for our 25th Annual Gathering of Pilgrims, March 31-April 3, 2022. Our theme will be “Rekindling the Camino Spirit”, and the program is already shaping up to include many of the speakers and events that have inspired us through the years, while incorporating new elements that promise to build enthusiasm and excitement as we dream about future adventures. Registration for the 2022 Annual Gathering will open in January 2022 … so save the dates!”

#3. Plans for a new long distance trail in France 2500 km, 6 stages. Check it out here: https://en.hexatrek.com/

#4. PCT Days/Summer Festival: PCT Days is AUGUST 20-22, 2021. “Pacific Crest Trail Days is an annual summer festival that celebrates and promotes hiking, camping, backpacking & outdoor stewardship.  Attendees can participate in activities, games, & presentations, win awesome gear at the raffle, and get great deals on the latest outdoor products from sponsors at the Gear Expo.  If you’re into car camping, day hiking, long distance hiking, or just curious, a wide-range of gear and info will be here!  Don’t miss out on a great time at the 14th annual PCT DAYS, located in the Marine Park of Cascade Locks, Oregon…the heart of the Columbia River Gorge!

“PCT DAYS is free to attend, with a suggested donation of non-perishable food, personal care products, or a monetary contribution to the FISH food bank, which serves the local community.  All raffle proceeds support the American Long Distance Hiking Association-West and the Pacific Crest Trail Association.  Overnight camping is available for a fee and the event is family-friendly. Vendors will be offering great food, coffee, beer and non-alcoholic beverages.  No dogs, glass or alcohol may be brought to PCT DAYS and parking is free.”

“Volunteers will receive free camping on Thunder Island and an ALDHA-West hat as a thank you.  Help is needed with: Selling Raffle Tickets on Saturday 8/21; 9:00am-11:00am (2 volunteers needed); 11:00am-1:00pm (2 volunteers needed); 1:00pm-3:00pm (2 volunteers needed); 3:00pm-5:00pm (2 volunteers needed); Hiker Breakfast food setup and cleanup Sunday 8/22; 6:30am-9:30am (2 volunteers needed). Please email us at secretary@aldhawest.org if you’re interested in volunteering. Check out www.pctdays.com for more details.

#5. ALDHA-West Board Nominations are OPEN and Triple Crown info: “Open Positions: President, Secretary, Board Member at Large, and Board Member at Large. We need YOU! Join our team and help us create community in the world of hiker trash. Nominate yourself or others here! Triple Crown Award Applications close at the end of August! If you are looking to apply for your Triple Crown this year, get yourself in gear and apply; don’t delay – apply today!

PLUS: “Hiker Olympics: As part of our 2021 virtual Gathering, we’re kicking off an independent, virtual Hiker Olympics!  Complete at least 5 of the items on our list, submit the form on our website, and be entered to win one of a bunch of prizes (TBD, but think classic AW raffle items!) at the Gathering on October 7.  While you’re checking items off your list, snap some photos and share them with us! Tag us on social #AWHikerOlympics and/or submit them with your entry. Join the Hiker Olympics. www.aldhawest.org

#6. Timothy Olson has set a new record for completing the 2,650 miles of the Pacific Crest Trail (PCT). He started at the southern border on June 1, 2021and reached the US/Canada Northern Terminus at 10:48pm PST on July 22, 2021 (51d 16h 55m 0s). His was a supported hike meaning that he had help along the way—supplies brought to him, or carried along by others. www.fastestknowntime.com/tracking

 #7.  Marcy publishes Shinrin-Yoku: Poems and Prose. I really have enjoyed reading through Marcy’s new book, Shinrin-Yoku. (Shinrin-Yoku is a Japanese term for “forest bathing.”)  Marcy was one of the amazing women that I interviewed about 20 years ago for my We’re in the Mountains Not over the Hill). In particular I like the combination of poetry and prose. I have enjoyed being able to skip around and read the various pieces slowly so I can savor each one.  At the moment, I am quite taken with her “Ice House Cabin.” Not only do I get to travel somewhere I haven’t been, but I get to traipse along with her, her daughters, and their black labs. “Molly is standing in the middle of the stream, biting the water plume that roostertails off the rocks. Ely is lying belly down in the pool, drinking.” The book is available on Amazon in paperback and on Kindle. https://www.amazon.com/Shinrin-Yoku-Poems-Marcyn-Del-Clements/dp/1777089565/

#8. Bears — Fears and Facts. In the article “Bear Attack Fatalities Are Up This Year. Is it a Trend, or Just a Coincidence?” from Outside online/first published by Backpacker.com there’s much of interest about recent bear attacks, how to keep the numbers in perspective, and how to be safe out there.

Some facts: “Grizzly and black bears have killed five people in North America over the last five months.” Since these fatalities are relatively recent, you may have read about them, but in short: two were in Calgary (Canada) and three were in the U.S. (one outside Yellowstone, two in Montana, one in Colorado (black bear). In 2020, there were four fatalities in Canada/U.S. from bear attacks, in 2019 only two. 

According to supervisor research biologist Frank van Manen of the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team, “the explosion in outdoor recreation as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic may play a role in increased human-bear interactions. More humans visiting trails and wilderness areas naturally leads to bear encounters, which sometimes result in human injury or even death. But this year’s numbers are still too small to consider this anything other than speculation.”

“Human-bear conflicts, which include anything from property damage, human food raids, livestock depredation, and, yes, attacks, increase in areas where bears are expanding their range, says van Manen. In the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, where his studies are focused, grizzlies have tripled their range over the past 40 years, and the overlap between human use areas and grizzly territory has grown wider. This has led to increased interactions between humans and bears, and in some cases, these interactions lead to violence. But, van Manen says, this year’s attacks needn’t set off alarm bells.”

“It is important to recognize that in the vast majority of bear encounters, bears avoid any form of confrontation and leave without incident, which of course does not make the news,” he says. “Physical attacks are extremely rare events that tend to be unpredictable and vary widely over time and geography.”

Keep it in perspective: driving to the trailhead is more risky than hiking in bear country.

https://www.outsideonline.com/outdoor-adventure/exploration-survival/bear-attack-fatalities-are-up-this-year-is-it-a-trend-or-just-a-coincidence/

Advice from those in the know. https://www.bearbiology.org/about/safety-in-bear-country/

#9. REI and Hipcamp. A new partnership between the sporting goods store and a company that offers places to stay, camp, explore. “Picture it. You, your dog and your favorite people in a cabin by the lake…or a tent on a blueberry farm…or a fancy yurt by the ocean. Meet Hipcamp—unique outdoor stays for anyone open to adventure.” (My space is limited here, check it out at https://www.rei.com/h/hipcamp

#10. S.F. Bay Regional: Berkeley Path Wanderers is great at have hikes for people of all ages, fitness, and hiking interests. Here’s one of many that I think would be fun: “Berkeley Hills sunset hike. Friday, August 20, 6 to 9 p.m. Led by: Leader: Alina Constantinescu. It’s free, no registration needed—just be at the Tamalpais Path on the East side of Euclid Ave, across from end of Eunice Street at Codornices Park in Berkeley, CA. “Grab a flashlight and let’s kick-off the weekend with a nice evening hike! The route is 4 miles, with hills and staircases. Estimated duration is 3 hours.” More info here: https://www.berkeleypaths.org/upcoming-events/2021/8/20/berkeley-hills-sunset-hike

++++
Thank you everyone. Stay well, keep hiking when prudent. I encourage you to send in items of interest to the hiking community to me at backpack45 “at sign” yahoo.com

Susan ‘backpack45’ Alcorn
Shepherd Canyon Books, Oakland, CA

https://susandalcorn.com
https://www.backpack45.com

Author of Walk, Hike, Saunter: Seasoned Women Share Tales and Trails; Healing Miles: Gifts from the Caminos Norte and Primitivo, Patagonia Chronicle: On Foot in Torres del Paine; We’re in the Mountains Not over the Hill: Tales and Tips from Seasoned Women Backpackers; and Camino Chronicle: Walking to Santiago.

Please note: Hiking and backpacking can be risky endeavors. Always be prepared for emergencies and carry food, water, shelter (warm clothing, etc.), flashlight/headlamp, matches, first aid supplies, and maps. Cell phones don’t always work. Leave word where you are traveling and when you are due back.

To subscribe, unsubscribe, or send a message to this (almost) monthly newsletter, please email Susan at backpack45 “at sign” yahoo.com

Susan Alcorn’s Backpacking & Hiking Tales and Tips, December 2020

*** we are moving the newsletter from the News page to the blog, so each newsletter can be linked to independently – on the news page there will be a link to the newsletter ***
 
Susan Alcorn’s Backpacking & Hiking Tales and Tips, December 2020
     Happy holidays!
2010-12-21_17-12-52_7514_P80
Contents:
1. As Hiking Surges During the Pandemic, So Do Injuries
2. Audio walks—armchair and onsite
3. Camino Masks 
4. Treeline Review helps with finding good gear for gifts!
5. Drawing the Colors of Winter 
6. Wearing a Mask While Running
7. Past, Present and Future on the Bay Area Ridge Trail.
Walk, Hike, Saunter 
is now available
in both print and
Kindle versions!  
 
Articles:

Read More

Continue reading “Susan Alcorn’s Backpacking & Hiking Tales and Tips, December 2020”

Gratitude for our trails

Thanksgiving and Gratitude

Sunol Regional Park, Alameda County, CA

Here in the S.F. Bay Area, the days have been so mild with daytime temperatures in the 60s and 70s, it’s hard to believe that it’s almost Thanksgiving. However, when it starts getting dark at 5 PM, and colder, we realize we have to work a bit harder to fit hikes into our shorter daytime hours.

This reminds me that I have much to appreciate about where I live, why I try to support environmental causes, and how grateful I am for the thousands of people here who work to protect our environment.

Sunol Regional Park, Alameda County, CA

In particular, I am reminded of the importance of the regional parklands around me, which…

  • provide hundreds of miles of trails that I can hike. 
  • bring ever-changing displays of flowers, trees, and other plants. 
  • have quiet places to clear my head and exercise my body.
  • inspire my writing and photography with its scenic beauty.
  • support wildlife—from ladybugs covering entire branches; herons stalking their prey; hawks soaring overhead; flickers hammering cavities in tree branches to build their nests.  
  • offer the opportunity to gain perspective on our place on this earth.
  • allow free, or inexpensive, visits to all who want to come. 

And, people are instrumental in what happens…

  • by envisioning the setting aside of parcels of land to create parklands.
  • when they work to acquire properties that would otherwise turn into developments.
  • by volunteering to help with fund-raising, to interface with the public at the kiosks and gift shops, and by organizing work parties for weed control.
  • when they become park employees that build fences and picnic tables, clear out invasive plants, repair storm damaged trails and roadways, and educate park visitors. 
  • by voting in tax measures to support and improve our parks

Galen Rowell, photographer, climber, author (1940-2002) in  Bay Area Wild: A Celebration of the Natural Heritage of the San Francisco Bay Area wrote,  “The San Francisco Bay Area holds the most extensive system of wild greenbelts in the nation, with more than 200 parks and other protected areas lying within forty miles of the city.”

We are truly blessed to live here.